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Can a tenant install ADT in his rental without landlord permission?
Can a tenant install ADT in his rental without landlord permission?A friend has a garage unit he is renting to a tenant he wants to evict. He let him move in over 15 days ago without paying rent, and with a verbal agreement that he would vacate by March 1st. Recently the tenant installed ADT security without permission. Is this grounds for eviction? State is CT.First I have to say that I am not familiar with CT requirements, or the requirements of the specific location you are referring to in CT. There are a few issues I see, with the scenario you described.It sounds like you ‘rented’ a storage unit, as a residential unit, although you did not actually ‘rent’ it.Allowing anyone to move in (even in a residential rental unit) without paying anything is advance, is never wise.ADT should not have installed anything on property that you own, without your permission. I would contact them immediately.Since it sounds like you did not “rent” the unit to him, but you let him move in, that different processes may be required to ‘evict’ him. Contact your local Clerk of Court and explain the situation specifically to them in order that they may be able to point you in the right direction to get things resolved.Contact the police immediately because the ADT system should not have been put in without your permission, and it also hints at the possibility of some illegal activities taking place on your property.Thanks for the A2A.
How do we tell our landlord to stop coming onto our property without permission?
You look over your rental agreement for anything you might of missed that would give him permission to be on the property, then you check your local landlord tenant act. Go over the information very carefully.If there is something there that gives him "any time/ any reason" access you could find out why and negotiate or wait till the lease is up and move being very careful to read the fine print in the future. Or……If he is breaking the law, you could write him a letter stating facts and letting him know the law and kindly ask that he follow said laws to the letter. Or contact an attorney to do this for you.Either way how you communicate with the landlord will impact the out come. Remember the old saying " you attract more flies with honey", being nice goes a long way.
I rented an apartment and later because of lost job I rented out one of its room without landlord’s permission. Is it illegal to afford rent like that?
Short answer is yes. You signed a lease with a landlord, if you actually took time to read it. Its probably stipulated there in the right ot occupancy section, that you are strictly prohibited from rent out any part if the space to another party without the landlords written permittion. Or something to that effect, which means when he finds out, he can terminate your lease and evict you from the property. While you're covering your rent, and I'm sure the landlord likes that part, you are committing fraud. You need to understand that the landlord allows YOU to let his space, but did not in any way give YOU right right to ownership. Therefore you have No Right to rent to another.
Can you grow cannabis in your apartment without permission to your landlord?
No.It’s a federal crime to grow marijuana in the United state, unless you are part of the research facility run by the University of Mississippi:Marijuana Research under NIDA contract at the University of MississippiEverything else is federally illegal, and the DEA can bust down the door at any time.If you are a commercial grow operation, you cannot legally obtain a banking account for your grow business because your bank could have its federal banking charter revoked, and be forced to go out of business (usually, the charge is “money laundering”).Additionally, if you grow even one plant in a planter in your apartment, the DEA can (and has) confiscated entire apartment buildings — so your landlord has a massive incentive to preventing you from doing that.Commercial marijuana dispensaries cannot get leases for commercial property, since it can likewise be confiscated by the DEA. This is why most dispensaries start out of people’s houses, and move to commercial facilities only when they can get sufficient cash to pay for a commercial property.If the seller of the property knows where the cash came from, then they are at risk of having the funds — or anything they buy with it — confiscated as the proceeds of a criminal enterprise.Since cash deals in excess of $10,000 must be reported to the IRS, it’s likely that the deal will not happen for cash, rather than via a cashiers check.While you can buy a cashiers check with cash, a bank will likewise want to know where the cash came from, and then refuse to do business with you — again for licensing reasons.Be aware that being “legal” at the state level in no way makes marijuana legal.It just means that the laws are not being enforced at the state level.Just as abortion is illegal in a number of states — due to laws which were ruled unconstitutional after Roe v. Wade, or more likely, Planned Parenthood v. Casey — that law is meaningless — the state law is meaningless — due to federal law and the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution.Your lease almost certainly contains language prohibiting illegal activity.Expect your landlord to give you a 3 day “Notice To Quit” if they see your “friendly house plant”.Apart from it meaning you are likely smoking on the premises — a probable violation of the lease… and of state law in California — you are committing a federal crime that might result in them losing their property.You will be lucky if they do not call the DEA on you (they probably won’t, replacing a door is expensive).Don’t freaking do it.P.S.: All things considered, insurance will likely cover most of the cost of a new door, and I’ve been thinking about a new door anyway.
Why do I have an account on Quora if I never signed up?
I’ve noticed that a lot of people have asked this question in various ways and, through research and experience, I’ve found out why.Quora API can find your profile details from your existing accounts like Google, Facebook and/or other places and automatically make you an account on Quora without you ever consenting to it or realizing it.When you finally ‘join’ Quora officially, you log in to an account that was probably made ages before you even actually joined.It is likely that you searched up something on a search engine that associated to Quora somehow and you logged in with one of your social media accounts, generally speaking, Facebook.Many of Quora’s website traffic is from people searching things on the internet and to find answers, looked in Quora.To disconnect social media accounts that have connected, you can go to Your profile picture Settings from the drop down menu Account from the side menu and scroll down to see Connected Accounts. Disconnect all or some as desired and done! Those accounts now have no connection to Quora whatsoever.You can also completely delete your Quora account : Your profile picture Settings Privacy Delete Account.
If I am out, my landlord enters my room without permission and goes through my things. I put a lock on my door, now she's asking for a key? What are my tenants rights?
If I go out, my landlord will go in my room without permission and go through my things. I put a lock on my door, now she's asking for a key? What are my tenants rights?This reminds me of when I was in college in 1971–2.When I was in my first year of college, a bunch of us were sharing rooms in so-called “approved” off-campus housing (AKA firetrap) in Towson. There simply wasn’t enough housing for all of the students who wanted it, and were desperate. The stars were so narrow, that you could have almost become intimate passing a housemate on the stairs.My roommate and I had to complain about the heat several times to our landlady before she turned on the steam radiator in our room. She said that wshe thought we didn’t want any heat because the window was open. We finally had to use a hammer to get the window unstuck—and no we d idn’t break it. Finally, our landlady had no more excuse for turning us blue.Then one day, one of the young women said, “Mrs. B. is snooping through the drawers when she cleans.” Another one said, “I know how to fix that!”She started a fake diary, and put it in one of her drawers. In one entry, she added that our landlady was snooping every time that she cleaned. The snooping became a thing of the past.Hopefully, there is at least a county Landlord-Tenant Commission. At least now, you can look these things up on the Internet. We didn’t have any recourse that we know of in the early 1970’s. I urge you to look up this information ASAP. I think in my county, they even have some people who will help if mediation is required. So look up your rights immediately. A shared house is a different situation, and can be more difficult that if you are only renting a room. But as a tenant, you have some rights. too.This also assumes that you are doing nothing illegal yourself. Good luck, and before she asks again for that key, DO YOUR RESEARCH!!
Can a landlord go into my room and have my dog taken to the dog pound without my permission?
If there is a prohibition in your lease concerning pets, your landlord is within his or her right to involve the local police or dog warden in removing the dog from the premesis. Legally, entering your apartment without the input of the cops and taking anything, including a dog, is not allowed.
Is it legal for the landlord to enter tenants apartment without permission?
I’m a landlord but have also been a renter. A lot of answers here and I’d like to summarize the answers.For an emergency, yesWith prior notice and permission, yesWith prior notice but no permission? Here we have a dispute. Some say yes, and some say no.I don’t know the answer to #3. It may depend on your location. Some thought experiments suggests the potential problems with the “yes” answer.I give my tenant 48 hour notice that I wish to enter the premise at 3:00AM. I don’t think this will hold up. Maybe there are time restrictions on when I can enter?I give my tenant 48 hour notice. They tell me the time I want to come in is not OK with them but another time will work. I come anyway. I knock on the door but there is no answer. I use my key to get in. Before seeing me, my tenant thinks I’m a robber doing a home invasion and shoots. I’m dead. This doesn’t sound very good and the tenant will probably get off.I give my tenant 48 hour notice. Same as the previous situation. I come in and find my tenant in a wild act of consensual sex. I think I have a nasty lawsuit on my hands and I probably will lose.I give my tenant 48 hour notice in writing. My tenant replies in writing, OK but not at the time suggested and she wants to be there. I come in on my own schedule anyway and no one is there. My tenant reports to the police that multiple valuable items were missing. She has a video showing it was me who entered the apartment and documentation saying this wasn’t OK. I think I’m arrested now.In any case, you as a landlord should know that even if get permission and enter legally, there are limits. A tenant has a legal right to the reasonable enjoyment of their home. If you were to insist on inspecting every week, you should expect a lawsuit for harassment.
When does the landlord have the right to come in without permission?
That depends on local statutes and your lease.In Ohio, a landlord can only enter without permission for “health or safety” reasons. If they suspect you died and are decomposing in the house, or there is an obvious such as fire, flooding, or infestation of bugs. If there are no “health and safety issues” that are obvious, they must give 24 hours notice to enter. I don’t think taking your garbage out once a week counts, unless that is causing bugs.As far as showing the home to re-lease it, they can show it anytime with 24 hours notice. The only exceptions in Ohio are exemptions clearly spelled out in your lease. Cleaning is the same deal. Check your lease!
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